Don’t allow expensive mistakes

Companies need to avoid two expensive mistakes:

  • Not dealing effectively with harassment
  • Getting investigations wrong

These have been listed by People Management  as two of HR’s costliest mistakes.

Allowing damaging behaviour to go unchecked or conducting a poor investigation can cost companies a great deal of money.  If cases go to a tribunal, it can cost on average £8,500 to defend a claim and the average award during 2013-14 was £12,148.30.  These figures do not include sickness absence, disruptive team working, resignations, management time dealing with challenging people issues, etc.

Contact me, Jean Kelly, on 01753 861771 or email info@jeankellyconsultancy.co.uk , if you would like an objective, thorough and fair investigation into a harassment or bullying allegation in your workplace.  Take advantage of the impartial approach we have developed over the last 20 years.  Or, even better, contact me if you would like me to help mediate and diffuse the conflict you are faced with.

Let’s end harassment and bullying

It’s time for a change.

Present methods of dealing with harassment and bullying in the workplace are not working.  We need a win/win not an ‘eye for an eye’ approach.

Check out my article and together let’s rethink how to deal with harassment and bullying.

Best wishes, Jean

Learn how much workplace disputes cost your company

Conflict Calculator

Prepare to be shocked when you realise how much harassment and bullying is costing your company.

Click Here and received your free Conflict Calculator and see how the money is adding up.

If you would like to discuss informal or formal ways of dealing with harassment and bullying to encourage these issues to be resolved, please email me on info@jeankellyconsultancy.co.uk.  I will be happy to help you deal with these challenges.

Kind regards, Jean

Learn how to deal with difficult people – quickly and easily

If you want to make a short, sharp impression on your workforce at a conference or team meeting, check out the talks I am offering at http://www.jeankellyconsultancy.co.uk/services/motivational-and-interactive-talks/ .  The topics I have prepared include not only Investigating and Raising Awareness of Harassment and Bullying, but also a series of talks to deal quickly and easily with a variety of people management challenges. 
For example, did you know you can Deal with Difficult People Quickly and Easily?  During this interactive talk, you will begin to realise that you can change how you react to ‘difficult’ people and get a postive response instead.
Invite me to talk at your meeting and I will explain how.
info@jeankellyconsultancy.co.uk

12 tips to promote harmony in 2013

To commemorate the last time the numbers in the date will be the same this century – i.e. 12/12/12 here are my 12 tips for promoting workplace harmony in 2013.  Let’s make next year the best one yet for developing happy and effective workplace relationships.

 My 12 Tips 

  1. Train managers in people management skills.  Happy confident managers make happy confident teams and vice versa.
  2. Listen to your staff and encourage them to be involved in making decisions – they will then own any changes you make and not fight against them.
  3. Coach staff to achieve even more.  What skills and qualities do your staff have?  You won’t know the full range until you begin to coach them.
  4. Develop strong Dignity at Work policies and procedures to make sure staff know how to deal with conflict issues.
  5. Develop robust informal resolution procedures.  There are usually no real winners when complaints go formal.  Early, informal resolution creates harmonious workplaces. 
  6. Train key staff in conflict resolution skills – easier to nip conflict in the bud than have prolonged formal investigations.
  7. Learn how to build effective and harmonious working relationships after disputes have occurred – consider developing your mediation and reconciliation skills.
  8. Develop a sound grievance investigation procedure and train managers to investigate objectively and impartially in accordance with the procedure. No more subjective investigations in 2013, please.  Findings based simply on facts are unlikely to be appealed!
  9. Encourage staff to develop their interpersonal skills.  If they read my powerful little book, How to be Bully Proof, they will be empowered to deal with ‘difficult’ people rather than become complaining victims.
  10. If you are a manager, spend time talking with your staff and getting to know them. Believe that they want to know you and to build a trusting relationship with you.  They do!
  11. Deal with difficult situations immediately- don’t let them fester.  If you avoid dealing with them, they will become more entrenched and harder to resolve.
  12. Talk to me in confidence by phone or email – don’t struggle on your own.  Take advantage of my 20 years’ experience dealing with workplace conflict.  I am here to support you!

info@jeankellyconsultancy.co.uk

What is the difference between Harassment and Bullying?

In my last blog, I explained that Harassment and Bullying have a lot in common.  So why do we need two words?

Here is my simple way of understanding the difference.

 Harassment is a form of DISCRIMINATION

 For harassment to occur, a person has to prove that they were on the receiving end of the unacceptable behaviour because of their:

  •  Age
  • Disability
  • Gender reassignment
  • Race
  • Religion or belief
  • Sex
  • Sexual orientation

 These are known as the seven ‘protected characteristics’. 

 Bullying is mean behaviour to one or more people.

 For example, if a member of staff was offensive in some way to all members of their team, they could say they were being bullied by that person.

 However, if that member of staff was only offensive to the women in the team, the women could say they were being sexually harassed by that person.  In other words, they were being treated that way because they were women.  If someone picks on only staff from certain ethnic groups, this could be construed as racial harassment.

 Harassment could take place if someone was treated in an offensive and unacceptable way because of any of the seven protected characteristics.

 If our behaviour can be construed as discriminatory as well as offensive, we could be faced with a harassment claim.   Or, if there is no evidence of us picking on someone because of one of the seven protected characteristics but we nevertheless abuse our power in some way, we could be told we are bullying them.

 Harassment and Bullying have unpleasant, damaging and time-consuming effects on our workplaces.  If you would like to learn how to confidently:

  • Understand the difference between harassment and bullying
  • Know your rights and responsibilities as a manager and worker
  • Understand your legal responsibilities and how to avoid legal pitfalls
  • Know the difference between bullying and strong, fair management
  • Ensure your staff behave appropriately at work – so cutting down on bullying and harassment grievances and complaints

click here for full details of how to immediately download my unique, online learning pack.  I have demystified harassment and bullying and simplified the concepts involved.  By working through this pack, anyone in the workplace can become aware of these important issues and learn to manage and interact in an appropriate way.

 

Harassment and Bullying – What you should know!

This is Number One in our series on Raising Awareness of Harassment and Bullying at Work.

What do the words Harassment and Bullying have in common?

During the 20 years I have been training, investigating and consulting in harassment and bullying issues, I have encountered the words ‘harassment’ and ‘bullying’ being used interchangeably, wrongly and unnecessarily. People tick the ‘I have beenbullied’ box on Employee Engagement Surveys to cover a range of issues. For example:
• When they did not get a rise they had been expected.
• Their department is being downsized.
• They feel overworked.

The word ‘harassed’ has many meanings in the English language. Here are a few synonyms I found in the Word dictionary:

• Stressed
• Hassled
• Worried

And we often associate the word ‘bullying’ with nasty behaviour at school.

However, the words have specific meanings under employment law and I find the easiest way to define these words is first to consider what they have in common.

The list below is not necessarily in order of importance, but the chances are that a complaint of harassment or bullying would include some or all of the following:

1. Unwanted behaviour by the person on the receiving end.
2. A one-off or repeated event.
3. A bad effect on the individual.
4. Abuse of power and disrespectful behaviour.
5. Unreasonable behaviour.

Remember that it is the impact of a person’s behaviour which is fundamental to harassment and bullying situations, rather than the intention of the perpetrator.

Well, if harassment and bullying have all this in common, what is the DIFFERENCE between them? Check out my next blog to understand the difference.

Image of the Harassment and Bullying PackHarassment and Bullying have unpleasant, damaging and time-consuming effects on our workplaces. If you would like to learn how to confidently:

• Understand the difference between harassment and bullying
• Know your rights and responsibilities as a manager and worker.
• Understand your legal responsibilities and how to avoid legal pitfalls.
• Know the difference between bullying and strong, fair management.
• Ensure a your staff behave appropriately at work – so cutting down on bullying and harassment grievances and complaints.

Then click here for full details of how to immediately download my unique, online learning pack - available at the Launch Offer Price for £99.

I have demystified harassment and bullying and simplified the concepts involved. By working through this pack, anyone in the workplace can become aware of these important issues and learn to manage and interact in an appropriate way.